T33 Silver Star (T bird)


This photo shows 400/411 Squadron T birds on the hangar line at Downsview
behind the front row of F86 Sabres {either 1957 or 1958}

400 Squadron T birds:

We are actively searching for more photos of  400/411 Squadron T33's from our past members.  If we are successful they will be posted here.  In the meantime below are a series of photos of this trusty and capable aircraft from other areas of the R.C.A.F.

Russ Brown sent along the following photos on 400 Squadron's 82nd anniversary with the following comments:

 "I thought that you might like this photo of a 400 Sqn T-33 now based at CZBB, Boundary Bay BC, about 5km from my door. I flew my first jet flight on squadron in 467 with Bud Wicks on 01MAY58 and my last jet flight on squadron in 467 with Wally Jaremko on 20Sep58.  On 06Oct. 58 I made my first ever twin engine flight with W/C Bill Draper in C-45 326... what a change!!"

T-33 467 is now owned by Tom Rogers

















Russ Brown

Russ's Grandson, Spencer










Last Flight of  Canadian T 33




11 April 2005, Shell Aerocentre by Ottawa's Macdonald-Cartier International Airport.
CF Photo






Captain Greg Castagner, from Vancouver, BC, with the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment (AETE) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta with Colonel Bill Werny (back seat) Commanding Officer of AETE prepares his CT-133 Silver Star aircraft (also known as the T-Bird) for its last flight which will take them to Mountainview, near Belleville, On, for disposal. The T-Bird is the longest serving aircraft in the Canadian Forces. It had close to 55 years of service and 2.4 million flight hours. It began service as an advanced jet trainer for the Canada's Air Force, and was later used as a ground attack aircraft for peacetime training. The final era of the T-33 had it employed as both a combat support and test aircraft with the Engineering Test Establishment in Cold Lake, Alberta, until it was withdrawn from service on 31 March 2005.
CF Photo

414 'Black Knights' Combat Support Squadron
To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the RCAF, 414 'Black Knights' Combat Support Squadron, based at 19 Wing Comox , painted one of its aircraft to reflect its squadron heritage. In March 1948, the first Lockheed-built T-33 Silver Star took to the air, ushering in a long and brilliant career for what has commonly become known as the T-Bird - the world's first purpose-built jet trainer. Canada is one of the last NATO countries which continues to fly the T-Bird under his Canadian Forces designation: CT-133. The fleet has been officially retired in 2001 except for 4 CT133s which continue to fly at AETE Cold Lake, Alberta.
CF Photo




The Black Knights' aircraft proudly displayed its Canadian heritage. Canada's 27 CT-133s are used for Electronic Warfare training support, target towing, fleet support, limited aggressor support and general utility. It was flown by 414 Electronic Warfare (EW) Squadron at 19 Wing Comox, 417 Combat Support (CS) Squadron at 4 Wing Cold Lake, 434 CS Squadron at 14 Wing Greenwood and 439 (CS) Squadron based at 3 Wing Bagotville. It was used by the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment in CFB Cold Lake.
CF Photo

Various Other T-33 Squadrons


 



Two CT-133 display some of the equipment that they were carrying on the underwing hardpoints. The lead T-Bird carries the missed-distance indicator under each wing which was used for assisting ships in surface-to-air gunnery while the second aircraft carries an ALQ-503 Electronic Warfare jamming pod under the right wing and an ALE-503 chaff dispenser under the left wing.
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Capable of simulating various levels of threats- fighters, bombers, strike aircraft, cruise missiles and drug-ferrying aircraft - the CT-133 was is employed in CF-118 operations on an almost daily basis at CFB Cold Lake and CFB Bagotville.
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A CT-133 from 439 Combat Support and a CF-118A from 433e ETAC format near Bagotville. The air force's fighter community is the combat support squadron's biggest customer, providing it with various levels of limited 'aggressor' and Electronic Warfare support.
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434 'Bluenose' Combat Support Squadron at 14 Wing Greenwood, NS was the only squadron in Canada's air force equipped with both the CT-133 Silver Star and CC-144 Challenger. In some scenarios, the Silver Star and Challenger worked together as a training package against fighter aircraft, navy ships, ground-based radars and army anti-aircraft systems. The squadron disbanded in 2001 with the retirement of its Silver Stars and Challengers.
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 417 and 439 combat support squadrons were each equipped with the CT-133 Silver Stars and CH146 Griffons, the latter still being used for base rescue support and general utility.
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Crews from 414 (CS) Squadron preparing to launch in their EW-configured CE133 Silver Star during a Maple Flag exercise in CFB Cold Lake.
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Pilots from 417 Combat Support Squadron returning from a 'Red Baron' mission in support of 441 Squadron at CFB Cold Lake.
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Refuelling a CT-133.
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50th anniversary of the CT133 Silver Star









1998 marked the 50th anniversary of the CT133 Silver Star, which CFB Cold Lake's 417 Combat Support Squadron commemorated by painting one of its aircraft.
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 Another view of CT133 299 painted to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the CT-133.
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The Red Knight







The Red Knight's show consisted of loops, rolls, Cuban 8s, horizontal 360s, inverted flight, and high speed passes. There was said to be nothing more spectacular than the flame-red Aircraft performing in a clear blue sky. Over the Red Knight era 17 pilots were involved, however only ever one at a time as the Red Knight was a solo act as opposed to a team display such as the modern Snowbirds.
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 This T-33, dubbed the Red Knight, was the official RCAF solo aerobatic display Aircraft of the 1950s and '60s.
CF Photo